What Is Bio Strategy?

TL;DR. Bio strategy is a framework to incorporate biology, biotechnology into your business.

“At the dawn of the 21st Century, strategy seems to have gone out of fashion.” – Chet Holmes, Certain to Win

The word “strategy” has become so overused that most people have forgotten what strategy really means.

John Cumbers and I were inspired to write What’s Your Bio Strategy? because it was clear that few businesses understood the impact that biology was having – even among those who could benefit from the technologies. After all, the phrase “knowledge is power,” is commonly attributed to Francis Bacon, the father of the scientific method and visionary for the first scientific institution, the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge.

So before we define bio strategy, let’s review the definitions of strategy.

Strategy defines your destination, not the road to get there.

Strategy is a guiding framework.

Strategy, according to Kenichi Ohmrae of McKinsey’s Toyko office, “isn’t about beating the competition. It’s serving customers’ real needs.

Harvard Business School professor Gary Pisano says,

“Strategy is nothing more than a commitment to a set of coherent, mutually reinforcing policies aimed at achieving a specific competitive goal. Good strategies promote alignment among diverse groups in an organization, clarify objectives and priorities, and help focus efforts around them.”

Martin Reeves, the managing director of Boston Consulting Group’s New York office and author of Your Strategy Needs a Strategy, suggests, all companies are identical to biological species in that both are complex adaptive systems. Therefore, the strategies that confer the ability to survive and thrive under rapidly changing conditions, whether natural or manmade, are directly applicable to business.

Bio strategy is a framework for incorporating biology into your business.

It is a plan to incorporate biology into your company’s existing mission, vision, and goals.

To find out more about What’s Your Bio Strategy? subscribe here.

What I’m Reading

The Veteran in the Field, Winslow Homer

Happy New Year!

Over the holidays, I unsubscribed from dozens of newsletters. I was very critical in thinking through whether a newsletter belonged in my email box. Was it helping me stay informed? Was it inspiring? Or, was it wasting (virtual) space? Here are a few of the newsletters I subscribe to stay up to date on biotech, pharma and synthetic biology news.

Biotech Newsletters

Biotech Investment Newsletters

Synthetic Biology Newsletters

Future Science

NY Local Newsletters

Miscellaneous Newsletters

I subscribe to few general business, sales, and inspirational newsletters from the following superstars:

I also subscribe to Nuzzel and receive a daily summary of the articles my Twitter network is reading.

What are you reading? Are there biotech newsletters that I missed?

Have you subscribed to messagingLAB’s newsletter? Sign up here.

2017: A Year Wraps and Good Riddance

Good Riddance 2017

It was a good year, but not without its challenges.

The TL;DR is:

  • mL grew more than 10 percent but is still down from its 2015 high.
  • I co-authored and published What’s Your Bio Strategy?
  • I moderated a panel at SynBioBeta SF17 and keynoted at Biofabricate 4 and enjoyed it.
  • I now live with myaesthenia gravis.
  • I started a novel that’s been in my head for more than ten years.
  • I took time off to travel from Boston to Montreal on a family cruise. I also spent some quality time in the Adirondacks.

My three words were bold, creative, authority and I kept those in mind all year long.

Macro Events

New York City and my microcosm in Brooklyn was depressed after the 2016 election. (For God’s sake, there was a planned victory party – at the intersection of President and Clinton streets just a few blocks from I live.)

The sense of the unknown and dread filled the air. I mean you could, you really could, feel it. And I don’t say that lightly.

I counseled friends to focus on ONE issue. I suggested focusing on what you could control. I knew trying to make sense of everything would be overwhelming. That’s proved true.

I promised myself I’d focus on science and education. I emailed and called my senators and representatives when a science or education issue came up.

As the year progressed, my focus became local.  I started participating in fights against charter schools. I started calling representatives, at the local and state level on sad state of the New York City subways. This was me being bold.

As we enter 2018, I’d like to do a better job helping those who are less fortunate. Especially, those who don’t understand or speak the language, nor how the system works. As a communicator, that is one of my most important jobs.

Karl’s Life Personal

2017 was a weird year.

One morning in April, I woke up seeing double. I went to the emergency room and spent a day and night undergoing a battery of tests.

I thought I had a brain tumor. I thought I had suffered a stroke. Luckily, those diagnoses were ruled out quickly.

36-hours into my visit, the neurologist arrived and said, “I’m getting you out of here. It seems like you have myaesthenia gravis.”

I wore an eye patch for nearly two months and learned that in New York City, no one looks at you twice with an eye patch. I also learned a lot of people have suffered worse – from migraine’s to Bell’s Palsy, cancer and strokes.

It took another month to get the final diagnosis: Myaesthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease.

An excellent neuro-opthalmologist treated me with steroids. After two months, my vision was back to normal.

In retrospect, it feels like it was stress induced (though my doctor wouldn’t agree). I hadn’t been taking care of myself. I was doubting my business. I was overwhelmed by a book I was writing. Two of boys were making major transitions. I thought I was ready. Maybe I wasn’t.

I’m better now and appreciate the importance of good health.

Once the illness ordeal ended, late in June, both Alejandro and Felix graduated. Alejandro graduated from Bard High School Early College. He had been accepted to Cornell and would be going in the fall. Felix graduated from fifth grade and joined his brother, Tomás, at the excellent Math and Science Exploratory (middle) school.

My parents traveled from California, attended the graduations, then we drove to Boston. There, we joined my sister, and her two kids. We boarded the Maasdaam and took a week long cruise along the east coast down the St. Lawrence River to Montreal.

I had never cruised before but it turned out to be a lot of fun. The best thing was the mornings: I’d get up and take a table at one of the restaurants, write in my journal and drink coffee as everyone woke up. Eventually, my father would join me to read the paper. Then little by little our family would arrive.

The only downside was food. It was excellent but I learned that I had little self-control and by the end of the fifth day, I had chronic heartburn. I’m sure that was due to the over eating.

Karl’s Life messagingLAB

messagingLAB started the year with a two big projects that abruptly came to an end in March. I wasn’t prepared and had to scramble.

Those projects were interesting, pushed me to use digital marketing skills that I hadn’t used in years, as well as coming up with creative marketing solutions for my clients.

Later in the year, two projects required me to draw upon public relations skills that I also hadn’t used in years. One of those projects resulted in some pretty spectacular media placements.

I lost one piece of business because the project ended (we’re still friendly and looking for ways to work together); one piece ended because they ran out of money (we had a great relationship); and one piece of business I lost because the add-on was deemed very expensive.

I lost three proposals because messagingLAB was too expensive. I didn’t like that but took those losses as lessons to work harder to explain the value in hiring me.

I also celebrated five years of working with one client. That was a significant milestone and says a lot about the relationship we have.

I took a bold financial risk# in the middle of the year that didn’t pay off and ended the year at a loss. I’ve been in the hole before and it’s no fun, so I’m taking aggressive steps to move on. (#No, it wasn’t Bitcoin, though I believe an online currency is an inevitability.)

I decided to examine messagingLAB’s offerings. I added media relations and am making it a policy to start all projects with a roadmapping session. I’m also creating a training company to help people understand the opportunities presented by biotechnology.

What’s Your Bio Strategy?

In November, John Cumbers and I published What’s Your Bio Strategy? We interviewed 25 trailblazing academics, entrepeneurs and thought leaders.

It was an incredible experience. And it helped cement me as an author and authority.

I started my career writing music reviews. My first published (and paid!) articles were interviews. I’ve written dozens over the years. The group interviewed for WYBS were among the best.

John invited me to moderate a session at SynBioBeta on Strategy. A month later, I gave a keynote at Biofabricate.

I’ll admit that in both cases, I was very nervous – it’s been many years since I took the stage – so I practiced. And practiced. And practiced. For SynBioBeta, I spoke to all the people on the panel before we got on stage.

For Biofabricate, I rehearsed and rehearsed and rehearsed. That way, when I got on stage, the presentation was automatic. 

Both were well received.

In December, I taught a bio strategy class to a non-technical audience. They enjoyed it. I also appeared on the FutureTech podcast.

So, I plan to do speaking and teaching in 2018.

The Dragon Burns

When the boys were very young, I would wake up with them, help them go back to sleep. Usually, I couldn’t fall back asleep. So, I picked up the bad habit of surfing infomercials.

Why?

Because infomercials among the most sophisticated marketing stories you can study.

At the time, Alejandro had already started to read chapter books. And like most boys in second, third, fourth grade, he read a lot of books about dragons.

Tomás would continue this and to this day, at age 13, he reads fantasy novels over other genres.

(He also plays Magic the Gathering, which includes a whole story line (Tarkhir) about dragon lords and how all the dragons are extinct. But one guy goes back in time to makes peace among the clans and revive the dragons.)

One night, I had this idea that it would be great to order a dragon from an infomercial.

The idea stuck and I ended up working the idea into a screenplay with a friend. We worked on it for more than a year.

We got busy and dropped the project. But the story never left me. It’s been brewing for five years. During that time, I’ve gotten a lot smarter about what we can create with biology.

I started writing the novel in September and joined a writers group. I workshopped the first 30 pages and got a positive response.

I’m going to continue the book and will tap into my community to get the science right.

It feels like a big book. It’s about applying creativity in new ways.

And now that I’m a bit more than half way through the draft I’m wondering where I’m going to go with it. I’ve written novels and screenplays in the past and wrote them for the enjoyment of it.

That’s how the book feels right now. So, I’m just enjoying the process.

I have no idea what 2018 will hold but I’m excited to define my three words, focus on growing messagingLAB, enjoying the writing, and my family.

2017 started with a sense of dread. 2018 looks to be very exciting.

 

My Futuretech Podcast Appearance

What’s Your Bio Strategy? First Review from Life Science Leader

Life Science Leader reviews What's Your Bio Strategy

Life Science Leader’s editor Rob Wright posted a very positive review of What’s Your Bio Strategy?

Says Rob:

Today we stand on the precipice overlooking a new frontier — the century of biology, and businesses of all kinds need to be prepared to not only embrace what is coming, but have a strategy for how to leverage biology for the betterment of their businesses and the good of the planet.

He continues:

When I finally had the opportunity to sit down and read it, my … mind … was … blown. Because though the authors interview 25 innovators about how biology is presently impacting a variety of industries, as well as what they think could happen in the very near future, it is even more telling to ponder what they haven’t thought of as being possible, which I found myself doing while reading. As I came across company names (pay attention to highlights) I pondered which might soon rival one of the three “As” of internet commerce (i.e., Alibaba, Alphabet [formerly Google], and Amazon) which have a combined value of about $1.6 trillion. The book discusses concepts such as using DNA for data storage or how the future of fashion may reside in garments being grown in vats (i.e., biofabrication) not woven on looms.

To read the full review, click here.

The is now on sale. Pick up a copy at Amazon. In the meantime, subscribe to our newsletter here.

It’s No Secret, Your Presentation Matters

If you can't see the image, you're missing a picture of a guy blowing a very long horn. He's dressed in lederhosen and calf socks. His presentation matters.
Sunday Morning Alpenhorn Presentation by John via Flickr

How you present your business, your story, your offer is no secret. In many cases, it’s the presentation that matters.

The voice you use, the magazines your content appears in, the social channels you engage in. Your presentation is the articles, blog posts, and white papers you publish. It’s the videos on your web site and on YouTube.

A consistent message presented regularly builds and engages your audience, and can increase trust.

In my humble opinion, presentation is also about reminding your audience that you are present and that your product or service can solve a very real problem they are having.

A few weeks ago, I asked my readers to take part in a project to help a product I’m working on creating. They asked me a number of questions, I provided answers.

Q. WHAT DO YOU DO TO ENGAGE YOUR AUDIENCE?

A. If you’re already blogging or sending emails, go back through your logs to figure out what your audience has been most engaged by. Look for patterns. They should be obvious. Create new content based on those patterns.

Maybe you don’t have a lot of content. In that case, survey your audience (like I did to create this post). Run surveys on social media targeted at your ideal audience. Pay for ads on Facebook. It’s the easiest, fastest, most inexpensive way to target very, very specific audiences.

Q. HOW DO YOU INCREASE INTEREST TO EXPAND YOUR AUDIENCE?

A. Use social channels to promote your content. If you must, pay to promote your content on those channels, they allow for very specific targeting.

Q. IS THERE A GREAT WAY TO RE-ENGAGE OLD CLIENTS?

A. Run a reactivation campaign. Remind the ex-clients of the successes you had together. Describe your new products or services, and how they can solve new problems. Also, remember that you can never stop marketing to old (or new) clients.

Let me know if you have any questions.