Tim Gardner: “There Is Almost No Physical Problem That Can’t Be Solved With Biology”​

I’m co-author of a book called What’s Your Biostrategy? With SynBioBeta’s John Cumbers, we’re writing about the impact of biotechnology on ALL business. Over the next few months, I’m going to publish interview summaries from the book. For more information, scroll to the bottom of the post.

In 2000, Tim Gardner wrote one of synthetic biology’s seminal papers: Construction of a Genetic Toggle Switch in Escherchia Coli. At Amyris he led the engineering of yeast strains and pioneered process technologies for the large-scale bio-manufacturing of renewable chemicals. He founded Riffyn to create tools to accelerate innovation in research and development. My co-author John Cumbers and I interviewed Tim for What’s Your Bio Strategy? Here’s a few excerpts from the interview:

“To increase the size of the bio-based economy, we need to reduce the cost of developing bio-based products that would have been made from petroleum and chemistry. If we can do that, then developing more specialized products will be acceptable. We’ll stop searching for billion dollar blockbusters. We’ll have more entrepreneurial successes and investors will be happy because we’re delivering on the promises of the bio-based economy.”

[“At Riffyn, our] thesis is that the solution to faster, better, cheaper drugs, and faster, better, cheaper bio-based products is the predictability of information. It’s about integrating information to make better, informed decisions. It’s not necessarily about fancy robots or magical tools.”

“Engineering has more science in it than people realize.”

“The idea that scientists are being paid more or are delivering more value or are in greater demand is not entirely true. It’s hard to hire engineers.”

“Value tends to accrue to people and organizations that can reduce uncertainty.”

“There are organisms that can detect light or transform electricity into energy for survival. Muscles are incredibly efficient compared to the hydraulics or batteries that you might put into a robot. If we want to use those properties to make the world a more efficient, higher performing, more enjoyable place, then we need to learn how to learn from nature.”

Want to read the full interview? Visit What’s Your Bio Strategy?

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