[Three by Five].12 Blue Tile Obsession

Vertical skateboarding was borne of drought and creativity.

In 1976 and 1977, Southern California suffered an extreme drought.

The water shortages were so extreme that agricultural activities in some parts of the Central Valley were ceased.

Reservoirs ran dry.

Homeowners drained their swimming pools.

Fires raged. Homes were abandoned.

At the time, skateboarders had just started riding wooden boards with urethane wheels.

Those wheels were more forgiving on rough surfaces and allowed the flow-y carving turns that mimicked the motions that surfers make when riding waves.

Somewhere in Southern California, a group of kids looked at those pools and saw possibility.

C.R. Stecyk III, founder of Zephyr Surfboards and Skateboards, co-author of Dogtown and Z-boys, said:

“Two hundred years of American technology has unwittingly created a massive cement playground of unlimited potential. but it was the minds of 11 year olds that could see that potential.”

 

When I want to look at skateboarders riding empty pools right now, I head over to Ozzie Ausband’s Blue Tile Obsession.

Ausband and his band of Southern California skateboarders (including legend, Tony Alva, one of the original pool riders) detail their exploits in words and high-resolution images.

Sometimes, they drive hours to find pools that were bulldozed.

Sometimes, they invest hours draining a pool, shoveling debris, sweeping and preparing the pool for riding.

The reward is the bowl, the experience, and the vicarious excitement you, as a visitor gets.

 

Three by Five.7 Yeast Engineering and Apple Clinics

Dennis Kunkel Microscopy/Science Source [1]
This week I’ve been thinking a lot about this MIT Technology Review article on writing the yeast genome. The article profiles NYU’s Jef Boeke, one of the founders and leaders of Genome Project write (GP-write). Writing a genome, which is still expensive, will drive advances across many fields (I’ve written about this project in the past and predicted – incorrectly – that the scientists would be finished by the end of last year.)

Healthcare is broken. It’s expensive, eats up a significant part of our gross domestic product, and entering the healthcare system is no fun. Just think about the forms you have to fill out every time you visit a new doctor. The news that Apple is creating medical clinics for its employees (and to test new products) is very very interesting. If you believe that Apple was instrumental in designing technology that is easier to use (and I do), then for sure they will create a healthcare experience that many of us will crave.

Image Caption:

[1] Colored scanning electron micrograph of lab-grown baker’s yeast.